dateline: Sep-2004

A BANDY TRIBE IN IRAN

You may be amazed to learn that the family name also exists in distant Iran.  The Iranian language, Farsi, belongs to the same Indo-Germanic group of languages as English.  It is written in the Arabic script but is not related to the Arabic languages.  Our Iranian correspondent Hamid R Bandy from Mashad tells us that in Farsi Bandy  means the one who is not free (almost prisoner), but it has a good meaning in Farsi literature for example "bandy-e-eshgh" means "the prisoner of the kingdom of love".  Derek Bandy suggests that this is similar to he "Bound man" meaning which we can see in English and clearly has the same Indo-Germanic root in "Bind"

Hamid tells us that the Bandy Tribe numbers 1400 or more people and has a history going back five or six centuries in Persia. With a history that long it would appear that the family name has a local origin and we are not related, But we have something in common - a great and rare name!

 

Hamid R Bandy from Mashad, Iran

AND ALSO IN SOUTH AFRICA

We shouldn't be surprised to find Bandys in South Africa, but we still are not clear on where they fit into the family.  Tracy Ann McKay (nee Bandey) wrote from South Africa to say that she is the daughter of Peter Wallis Bandey & Heather Sandra Bandey (nee Duncan).  I have an uncle, Michael John Bandey and he is married to Ann Bandey (who just recently passed away from cancer). They have three sons, David, John and Gavin Bandey. My paternal grandfather was David Wallis Bandey (a methodist minister and academic doctor) and he was married Florence Mary Bandey (nee Brecknock). We are the only Bandey's in South Africa. My grandfather's brother Tom (Thomas) died a few years ago. He was married to Edith, I think, and they lived in Truro, Cornwall.

Can anybody help with this family?

 


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